18
04:23pm

“If the audience can accept it, that’s another thing. But, like, you see, if the audience doesn’t accept it, then it’ll be a long, long, long time before we can dream about that audience I thought was there.
I can become Orson Welles, poor bastard. Just been turned down by the studio that, like, I’m making this movie for, Universal International, half a million dollar picture, man, you know, for half a million dollars, and I mean, if they can’t build up Orson Welles making a movie for half a million dollars and show it in the universities, then fuck ‘m. And fuck the universities, fuck everybody, man.
Because, like, you know, then there’s no audience. There’s only a lot of frivolous, like, you know, cheerleaders, God bless you, everyone, cheerleaders, I love you, I love your image on television, I enjoy you almost as much as the football game, I wish you had a little more coverage…
However, you know, I mean, I really love pretty ladies and all that, but, man, hey, you know, I mean, if there isn’t an audience for Orson Welles and half a million dollars in the universities, and for the people in this country, you know, then, then, why we’re making movies?”

— Dennis HOPPER in The American Dreamer (1971, L.M. Kit Carson & Lawrence Schiller)

6
04:19pm

Love you

179
10:46pm

filmrevues:

Happy 59th Birthday Willem Dafoe!

172
10:29pm

“Movies, like any other works of art - or presumptive art - don’t change. DVD “director’s cuts” aside (and there are, I think, legitimate debates to be had about them), most movies are destined to live their lives in the form in which they were first released. But the people who watch movies do change. They grow up - or at least older - and their perceptions of a particular movie change. Movies we loved as young people sometimes seem less lovable when we revisit them years later. The opposite is also true; sometimes we need more experience to appreciate fully the subtlety of movies we saw for the first time in the distant past. What’s true of us, as individual moviegoers, is also true of the world at large. It changes, too, and it is sometimes true, especially of visionary films, that they have to wait for their time to come.”

— Martin Scorsese (Scorsese by Ebert)

2183
10:26pm

This is Judy. She’s my friend.

1399
10:26pm

The iconic image of Brando as Stanley in A Streetcar Named Desire

55
12:59am

schwimmenlernen:

Kerouac

134
11:44pm

sinatraswooners:

Humphrey Bogart

259
11:41pm
371
11:39pm